A Doll with Blue Eyes

New Horizon English Course 3 (Showa 59)

On the morning of May 21, 1927, all the students of Kitamura Chuo Elementary School in Hokkaido were in the auditorium. On the stage were the flags of Japan and the Untied States.
The principal came in with a doll and handed it to a third grade girl student. It was te first American doll the students ever saw.
Then the principal read the letter that was carried by the American doll. "Her name is Leila, and she's from Cleveland. Please take care of her. She'll obey all the laws and customs of your country." After that, they stood up and sang "A Doll with Blue Eyes."

Kitamura Chuo Elementary School was not the only one that received an American doll. In 1926, the Committee on World Friendship Among Children in New York heard of Japan's Hinamatsuri. They got interested in the custom, and made a plan to send American dolls to Japan. Mothers and daughters in many cities made caps, dresses and shoes for the dolls. Each doll was given a name, and carried with her a letter to Japanese children.

About 12,000 dolls were sent to elementary schools and kindergartens in Japan. Leila was one of them.
How delighted the boys and girls were when they saw Leila! She had blue eyes and red hair, and wore a Western dress and small shoes. In those days most Japanese children wore kimono and zori or geta.
The doll could open and close her eyes. She even cried "Mama!" She was just like a real American girl.

In 1941, war broke out between Japan and the United States. As the war went on, teachers often got together and talked about what to do with the American dolls. One teacher said, "We're fighting against America. We must throw away the dolls at once." Another teacher said, "We must not forget they were sent by our enemy. Let's burn them."
The poor American dolls! Some were thrown into rivers, some were burned and some were torn to pieces. Soon people forgot all about the dolls with blue eyes.

In 1966, twenty-one years after the end of the war, an old doll with blue eyes was found in a closet at Azuma Elementary School in Gumma. It was Mary-chan, one of the American dolls sent in 1927. She was saved by one of the teachers.
The teacher said, "One day I was told to burn Mary-chan, but I couldn't. I knew my students loved her very much. I wanted to save her, so I put her in that closet."
The news about Mary-chan was broadcast on television, and then dolls with blue eyes turned up in one school after another. Out of the 12,000 dolls, about 160 survived the war. Leila was not among them.

Official translation

Taken from the New Horizon's teachers manual.

青い目の人形
1927年の5月21日の朝,北海道の北村中央小学校の全生徒は講堂に集まっていました。ステージの上には日本とアメリカの旗がありました。
校長先生は人形を手にして入場し,それを1人の3年生の女生徒に渡しました。それは生徒たちがはじめて見るアメリカ人形でした。
それから校長先生はそのアメリカ人形が持ってきた手紙を読みました。「この人形の名前はリラで,クリーブランドの出身です。どうぞ世話をしてあげてください。彼女はあなたの国の法律や習慣にすべて従います。」それから全員が立ち上がって「青い目の人形」を歌いました。

北村中央小学校がアメリカ人形を受け取ったただ1つの学校だったわけではありません。1926年に,ニューヨークの世界児童親善会は日本のひな祭りのことを聞きました。この習慣に興味を持ち,アメリカ人形を日本に送る計画を立てました。多くの市の母親と娘たちがぼうし,服,そして靴を人形のために作りました。どの人形も名前をつけてもらい,日本の子どもたちへの手紙を持っていました。

約12,000の人形が日本の小学校や幼稚園に送られました。リラはその人形の1つだったのです。
リラを見て生徒たちはなんと喜んだことでしょう。リラは青い目をして,赤い髪で,洋服を着て小さな靴をはいていました。当時,日本の子どものほとんどは着物を着て,ぞうりかげたをはいていました。
人形は目を開いたり閉じたりできました。「ママ!」と泣くことさえしました。本物のアメリカの少女みたいでした。

1941年に,日本とアメリカの間に戦争が起こりました。戦争が続くにつれて,先生たちはよく集まって,アメリカの人形をどうするかを話し合いました。ある先生は言いました。「わたしたちはアメリカとたたかっているんだ。すぐに人形は捨てるべきだ。」別の先生が言いました。「人形は敵から送られたということを忘れてはならない。人形は焼いてしまおう。」
かわいそうなアメリカの人形たち。川に投げこまれたものもあれば,焼かれたものや,ばらばらにされてしまったものもありました。じきに人々は青い目の人形のことをすべて忘れてしまいました。

戦争が終わって21年たった1966年に,群馬県の東小学校の戸棚から,青い目をした1つの古い人形が見つかりました。それは1927年に送られてきたアメリカ人形の1つ,メリーちゃんでした。彼女は先生の1人によって助けられたのでした。
その先生は話しました。「ある日わたしはメリーちゃんを焼いてしまうように言われました。でもわたしにはできませんでした。生徒たちが大好きだったのを知っていましたから。わたしは彼女を助けたいと思いました。それであの戸棚の中に入れておいたのです。」
メリーちゃんのニュースはテレビで放送されました。すると青い目をした人形が,ある学校でまた次の学校でというように現れました。12,000の人形のうち,約160が戦争を生き残ったのでした。リラは生き残った人形の中には入っていません。

See also